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Academic Catalog

University of Saint Joseph    
 
    
 
  Oct 19, 2017
 
2013-2014 Course Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Academic Policies and Procedures


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Advisement

Undergraduate

Academic Advisement is considered an integral part of the University program. Each degree-seeking student is assigned an advisor, who supports and guides the student in developing short- and long-term academic, career, and personal goals. With the academic advisor's assistance, students are encouraged to recognize how their interests and abilities relate to academic majors; to clarify individual values; and to plan educational programs that enable them to explore options for continued intellectual and professional development. Advisors are available to help students not only with academic issues, but also with other issues that accompany the transition to university life and the stress of pursuing a degree.

The Academic Advisement Center serves all undergraduates. First-year students are assigned to a professional advisor in the Advisement Center until the middle of sophomore year. During this time, the student and advisor work together to help clarify interests, focus options, and select a major. Once the student has decided on a major, has earned approximately 45 credits, and has met any departmental admission requirements, the student will be advised by a faculty member of that department.

At the University of Saint Joseph, the academic advisor plays an important role in providing students with information about the academic programs. However, it is the student who is ultimately responsible for her/his academic program. 

Majors and Minors

Undergraduate

Students must complete a Declaration of Major form to make formal application to a department for acceptance into a major upon completing 45-54 credit hours of study. Transfer students accepted with junior standing complete their application for major study during their first semester at the University of Saint Joseph.

Each department will notify the student of acceptance or rejection into the major. Formal verification of acceptance is filed with the registrar. You can search for the requirements for each of these major fields of study in Programs  section of this catalog.

The student is responsible for obtaining and completing the Declaration of Intended Major/Major forms from the Office of the Registrar.

Change of Major

Undergraduate

Students who wish to change majors should consult with their advisor prior to applying for acceptance into another department. Changing a major sometimes requires a student to complete additional credits in order to meet the requirements of the second department.

Students who wish to change their intended major prior to completing 45-54 credits should consult their academic advisor. The student is responsible for obtaining and completing the Change of Intended Major/Majors form from the Office of the Registrar.

Double Major

Undergraduate

Students who have the potential and interest may be accepted for study in two different major fields. Those who wish to pursue two majors should initiate plans prior to the end of their junior year. Exceptions to this deadline may be made only upon the approval of the appropriate chairpersons and the provost. Students pursuing a double major are required to maintain a cumulative grade point average of 2.67 in both majors, and must fulfill all departmental requirements for both majors. Students receive one degree (either B.A. or B.S. as appropriate) upon completion of two majors. The student's transcript and the Commencement program will list both majors.

Minor

Undergraduate

Students who have already selected their major field of study may elect to develop a minor field of study in order to broaden their area of expertise. Generally a minor consists of no less than 18 credits and no more than 21 credits with reasonable distribution above 100-level courses. No more than six transferred credits may be applied toward the minor. Courses taken pass/fail may not be applied. Completion of a minor requires that the student attain a GPA of 2.0 in courses constituting a minor.

These courses must be distinct from courses constituting the student's major. Students should make formal application to a department for acceptance into a minor at the time they register for their final semester.

In many disciplines specific departmental requirements or restrictions for a minor have been established. 

Certificates

Undergraduate and Graduate

Besides major degree programs, the University offers certificates in many areas. Certificate programs are designed to provide a career curriculum that is highly focused and limited in scope. Its purpose is to provide the skills necessary for immediate employment in a specific employment category. Some certificate programs align with baccalaureate degree programs, providing students with a clear path for continuing their studies and earning a university degree. The requirements for a certificate are specified to each program.

Certificates Offered  
Undergraduate    
 

Adelante Certificate 
Gerontology 
Juvenile Justice/Human Rights Certificate 
Latino Community Practice Certificate 
Legal Studies Certificate  

 
Graduate
 

Applied Behavior Analysis 
Autism Spectrum Disorders Graduate Certificate 
Dietetic Internship Graduate Certificate  Emerging Infectious Diseases Graduate Certificate 
Gerontology Online Graduate Certificate 
Healthcare Systems Management Graduate Certificate 
Homeland Security Management Graduate Certificate 
Integrative Genomics Graduate Certificate 
Latino Community Practice Graduate Certificate  
Contemporary Project Management Graduate Certificate 
Post Master's, Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner


     

Pre-Professional Interests - Dental  ,Medical  , Pharmacy  , Pre-Veterinary Studies (Plan of Study) 
Students interested in these careers will benefit from the advisory capacity of these studies. Students major in a degree program and use these study guidelines to assist in their curriculum choices.

Grades and Grading

Undergraduate and Graduate

Grades are indicated by a letter, with each letter having a specific value referred to as grade points. The grades and their grade points are:

Grade Grade Points Numeric Grade Equivalencies
A Superior 4.00 100-93  
A-   3.67 92-90  
B+   3.33 89-87  
B Above Average 3.00 86-83  
B-   2.67 82-80  
C+   2.33 79-77  
C Average 2.00 76-73  
C-   1.67 72-70  
D+   1.33 69-67  
D   1.00 66-63  
D- Lowest Passing Grade 0.67 62-60  
F Failure 0.00 Less than 60  
W Withdrawal - before midpoint of course
I Incomplete   
P Passing (C- or above) 
NR No Report from Instructor/Never attended class
AU Audit   
XF Academic Dishonesty

Faculty members have sole responsibility for awarding grades. 

Final grades are available online. All current students are able to access grades at MyUSJ. These grades become a part of the student's record and are entered onto the transcript of work at the University of Saint Joseph. In accordance with federal legislation, grade reports are given to parents or guardians only if the student provides the registrar with a signed written release.

Midterm

Each undergraduate student receives a mid-semester grade, which is not recorded on the student's permanent record. It is given as an indication of the student's achievement to date. A student should confer with her advisor concerning mid-semester grades.

Graduate

A grade of C or below is subject to review by the department in which the student is matriculated. A grade of C or below in two courses necessitates a reconsideration of candidacy. Receiving a grade of D or F in a required course necessitates repeating that course and a reconsideration of candidacy. Graduate students receiving a grade less than a C- for any course must retake the course. In individual circumstances, some departments may require a student to repeat a course in which that student has received a grade of C- or better. A student successfully repeating a course previously failed receives additional GPA credits, graduation credits, and grade points. A student successfully repeating a course previously taken with an inadequate grade receives additional GPA credits and grade points, but does not receive additional graduation credits.

Academic Credit

Undergraduate and Graduate

The unit of measure for student progress through the academic program is the semester credit hour. One semester credit hour is generally equated with one hour of class each week within one semester.

No student is allowed credit for a course unless formally registered by the registrar, or given credit for a course in which the student is registered as an auditor, even though the student has taken all the quizzes and examinations and completed all the required work.

Grade Forgiveness Policy

Undergraduate

Students who are readmitted to the University of Saint Joseph after an absence of five years of more and who maintain a grade point average of 2.5 for 24 credits, can petition the Committee on Admission and Records to have grades of F excluded from their cumulative grade point average. Courses in which an F was given will remain on the student's transcript, but grades of F will not be counted in the cumulative grade point average.

Graduate

If a student earns an F or D in a course, whether required or an elective, but repeats the course successfully, only the most recent of the two grades will be counted in the computation of the grade point average. The original grade, however, will be kept on the transcript as part of the student's cumulative academic record. The policy is limited to the first D or F successfully repeated during graduate study. The limitation to forgiveness of a single D or F grade may be waived by student petition to the program director with the final approval of petition being made by the Dean of Graduate and Professional Studies. If an F was the result of violation of the Academic Integrity policy, there is no grade forgiveness, even when the course is successfully repeated.

Students who repeat an equivalent elective course at another institution because they have received a grade of D or F can do so in accordance with the graduate transfer policy and with an approved petition. The original grade of D or F will appear on the transcript but will be removed from the calculation of the cumulative GPA. A grade of T for the transfer credit will appear on the transcript and will be used in computing hours but not grade points for graduation.

Schools or programs may have higher standards that prevail over Graduate School Policy.

Grade Changes

Undergraduate and Graduate

Once a final grade is reported to the registrar, it can be changed only by the instructor with approval of the department chair and the dean of the school. Only grade changes necessitated by earlier computational errors will be approved. Such changes must be made within six weeks after the last class of the given semester.

Grade Point Average (GPA)

Undergraduate and Graduate

The grade point average (GPA) is obtained by dividing the total number of grade points earned by the total number of credits attempted, less any pass or pass/fail credits.

  Credits Grade Grade Points Example  
  3 A 12.00 36 ÷ 12 = 3.00 (GPA)  
  3 P 0.00    
  3 C- 5.01    
  3   B+ 9.99    
  3 B 9.00    
  15   36.00    
           

All Consortium course work completed by a student matriculated at the University of Saint Joseph will be computed as USJ credit (including summer courses).

Incompletes

Undergraduates

Incomplete grades are generally given only for serious illness or emergency. The student must submit a request for an incomplete grade form, signed by the instructor, the student, and the dean of the school. The form must be submitted to the registrar prior to the week of final exams in order for an "I" grade to be assigned. Coursework must be completed within six weeks after the last day of class. If course work is not completed within this time, a grade of F will automatically be assigned. Under special circumstances, students may petition the dean of the school to extend the time limit in which course work may be completed.

Graduate

Incompletes (I grades) will only be assigned to a graduate student whose work is otherwise satisfactory but due to illness or unusual and extenuating circumstances is prevented from completing the work during the semester in which the student is registered. The student has the primary responsibility for requesting an incomplete grade from the course instructor prior to the final examination or culminating activity of the course. The student must provide documentation of any illness with the request for the incomplete. If the instructor agrees to the request, it is the student's responsibility to arrange with the course instructor to complete the coursework within six weeks. Under special circumstances, students may petition the Office of Graduate and Professional Studies to extend the time limit in which coursework may be completed. Forms to request an incomplete grade are available in the Office of the Registrar.

A student who does not arrange with the course instructor to complete the coursework, or does not satisfactorily complete the coursework as arranged, will receive a grade of F for the course.

Undergraduate Dean's List

To honor undergraduate academic achievement, the Dean's List is published at the end of each semester. Undergraduates who are full-time students are eligible for this honor if they meet the following requirements:

  • Are a full-time, matriculated undergraduate
  • Are enrolled in 12 or more letter-grade credits of course work during a semester exclusive of transfer credits and P grades
  • Have a GPA of 3.50 or greater for that semester
  • Earn no grade lower than a B in any course for that semester
  • Have no Incompletes or W grades for that semester

 

Part-time students are eligible to achieve Dean's List recognition provided they meet the following criteria:

  • Are matriculated
  • Are enrolled in six or more credits per semester exclusive of transfer credits and P grades
  • Achieve a GPA of 3.50 or greater for two consecutive semesters
  • Earn no grade lower than a B for those semesters
  • Have no Incompletes or W grades for those semesters

Notation of Dean's List will be recorded on the student transcript.

Satisfactory Academic Progress

Undergraduate

Grade Point Average
A cumulative GPA of at least 2.0 is required for graduation from the University of Saint Joseph. A student is expected to have achieved this GPA by the time 60 credits of course work have been completed.

Academic progress for part-time matriculated students will be reviewed after they have attempted the completion of 12 credits.

Second bachelor's degree candidates must maintain a minimum 2.0 GPA at all times in their academic work at the University of Saint Joseph. Some majors or programs require a higher GPA at all times. In addition to department requirements, second degree students must have a grade point average of 2.67 or better to graduate.

Undergraduate Academic Probation/Dismissal Policy
Any student who does not meet the minimal GPA requirement of a cumulative 2.0 GPA and/or has a semester GPA below 2.0 will be subject to review by the Academic Records Committee.

Academic Review
At the end of each semester, the Academic Records Committee will meet to review the records of students who do not have a cumulative or semester GPA of 2.0. Based on review, the Committee may recommend any one of the following: academic warning, academic probation, academic dismissal with appeal, or academic dismissal without appeal.

Academic Warning
Students who remain in good academic standing (cumulative GPA of 2.0 or higher) but whose semester GPA falls below a 2.0, will receive an academic warning which will be recorded in their academic advising file.

Students in their first semester who attempt fewer than 12 credits and who earn a cumulative GPA of at least 1.0 but below 2.0 will receive an academic warning.

Academic Probation
Students in their first semester who attempt at least 12 credits, and all students in subsequent semesters, will be placed on academic probation if their cumulative GPA falls below 2.0,  the standard for good academic standing. Students in their first semester who attempt fewer than 12 credits and earn a GPA below 1.0 will also be placed on academic probation.

The academic probation will be recorded on the student's academic transcript. Students who are placed on academic probation must adhere to the Academic Probation Agreement which will accompany the probation notification. Failure to adhere to the agreement can result in academic dismissal.

Records of students on probation will be reviewed by the Academic Records Committee upon completing their probationary semester.

Possible outcomes upon completing a probationary period:

  • If a student has a cumulative GPA of 2.0 or above, he/she will be removed from probation
  • If a student has a cumulative GPA below 2.0 but his/her semester GPA shows significant improvement (minimum of 2.5), the student will receive consideration for one additional semester of probation (continued probation)
  • If, after a probationary semester, a student has a cumulative GPA below 2.0 and semester GPA below 2.5, the student will be subject to academic dismissal
  • If a student has been granted a second probationary semester and after the 2nd probationary period his/her cumulative GPA is below a 2.0, the student will be subject to academic dismissal

Academic Dismissal
All students subject to academic dismissal will be reviewed individually by the Academic Records Committee.

Any one of the following reasons is grounds for dismissal with appeal:

  1. A student who has been placed on academic probation but fails to meet the probation requirements, including abiding by the Academic Probation Agreement
  2. First semester, full-time students who achieve a 1.0 or less GPA
  3. Part-time students after the first two semesters who achieve a 1.0 or less GPA 

Grounds for dismissal without appeal:

The student was granted an appeal and did not meet the requirements of the Academic Dismissal/Reinstatement Agreement. 

Academic Appeals

A student who has been dismissed for the first time may appeal to the Academic Records Committee for reinstatement. Appeals must be made in person and before the beginning of the semester in which the student is attempting to enroll. If an appeal is heard and granted, the student must abide by conditions set forth in the Academic Dismissal/Reinstatement Agreement, which must be signed by the student and a designee of the Academic Records Committee.

 In accordance with due process, a student wishing to appeal any action of the Academic Records Committee should submit an application to the Provost for a hearing before the committee. A student who has been dismissed without appeal or whose appeal is denied may not take courses at the University of Saint Joseph for two academic semesters following dismissal, but may reapply for admission thereafter.

Graduate Academic Probation

Students are expected to pass enough credit hours and maintain a grade point average sufficient to be considered as making satisfactory academic progress. A graduate student must have a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.67 (B-) in graduate coursework at the University to be in academic good standing at the graduate level. If at any time a graduate student's cumulative grade point average is below 2.67 or the student earns a D or F in a course, the dean of the school of enrollment and the program director/department chair will be notified and the student will be placed on academic probation. The program director/department chair notifies the student of her/his Academic Probation status. (At the end of every semester, the Graduate Office reviews all graduate transcripts and provides copies of the record of students of concern to appropriate deans and department chairs). Until the student has raised the GPA, the student remains on probation. Schools and programs may have higher standards that prevail over the Graduate School policy.

During the probationary semester(s), the student must receive a semester grade point average of 2.67 or higher. When the student's cumulative grade point average reaches 2.67 the probationary status will be removed. Students will be granted two semesters or six credit hours to achieve a cumulative GPA of 2.67. If this not be obtained, the student will be academically dismissed.

Graduate students on academic probation who participate in any of the University's tuition waiver programs become ineligible for such programs. All waivers are rescinded when students are placed on academic probation.

Academic Dismissal

A student whose cumulative GPA fails to meet the minimum required cumulative GPA at any time may be dismissed or lose matriculation status. The student must reapply for admission.

A graduate student must have a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.67 (B-) in graduate coursework at the University to be in good academic standing. If at any time a graduate student's cumulative grade point average is below 2.67 or the student earns a D or F in a course, the dean of the school of enrollment and the program director will be notified and the student's file will be reviewed. The student will receive a letter with the conditions required for continuing. A graduate student will be removed from probation when the student's cumulative grade point average in graduate coursework reaches or exceeds 2.67. No changes in status or financial assistance will be made until the end of the semester and will not be effective until the following semester. The student will be dismissed unless the cumulative grade point average exceeds 2.67 after six additional completed credits. Until the student has raised the GPA the student remains on probation.

Schools and programs may have higher standards that prevail over the Graduate School policy.

  • During the probationary semester(s), the student must receive a semester grade point average of 2.67 or higher. Students will be granted two semesters or six credit hours to achieve a cumulative GPA of 2.67. Should this not be obtained, the student will be academically dismissed.
  • Good academic standing does not automatically ensure continuation in a graduate program. A student may be dismissed for factors other than grades upon the recommendation of a committee of department faculty, the chair of the department/director of graduate program, or the dean of the Graduate School. The University reserves the right to exclude from further enrollment any graduate student whose conduct is deemed improper or prejudicial (inclusive of academic integrity issues) to the best interests of the University. The graduate dean together with the Graduate School Committee will handle such cases.
  • A student who has been dismissed for any of the reasons specified above may apply for admission to another program. The application process for seeking admission to a different program shall be the same as for new graduate students.

Dismissed students may petition for reinstatement into the program from which they have been dismissed by filing a written letter of appeal to the Graduate School Committee within 30 days from the time the dismissal notification is received. Students must demonstrate to the Committee that exceptional circumstances were involved and provide evidence indicating that they can raise the grade point average within one term. If the committee fails to approve the petition, the student is required to withdraw from classes for a minimum of three terms. Dismissed students are allowed to make only one petition for reinstatement to the program from which they have been dismissed. If the student is dismissed a second time after reinstatement, no additional petition for reinstatement will be considered. The program director, the department chairperson, the dean of the school, and the dean of the Graduate School must approve the petition for reinstatement. 

Credit-Hour Definition

At the University of Saint Joseph a credit hour is defined as the amount of class time including out of class work to meet the learning outcomes set forth. Generally, for each academic credit assigned to a course, students spend one hour per week in class and are required to spend two hours on out of class assignments per each hour of instruction spent in the classroom for a 15-week semester. For graduate courses, online courses or accelerated courses, students are required to spend the equal amount of total time per credit hour as spent in on campus courses. However the mix of time spent in direct instruction and time spent on assignments and other work may vary. Laboratories, internships, and practicums vary by program in terms of the number of hours required, but in general it is two-three hours per week per credit.

No student is allowed credit for a course unless formally registered by the Registrar, or registered as an auditor even though the student has taken all the quizzes and examinations and completed all the required work.

Discontinuing Academics

All matriculated undergraduate and graduate students
 

Official University Withdrawal

If a student does not plan to return to the University of Saint Joseph, he or she must file a properly completed and signed University Withdrawal Form with the Registrar's Office prior to the drop deadline of the major semester from which the student wishes to withdraw (fall or spring). In the case of School of Pharmacy students, summer is also considered a major semester. If the University Withdrawal Form is filed before by the drop deadline of a current or future semester, all courses for which the student is registered in the semester of the withdrawal will be dropped from the student record and a statement of "Official Withdrawal" will be entered on the student's academic transcript.  Matriculated  Graduate and Undergraduate degree-seeking students who officially withdraw and who have not been in attendance for three or more consecutive semesters, excluding summer, must apply for readmission through the appropriate Office of Admissions and follow the degree requirements associated with the term of their readmission to the University. (Former Non-degree students may be readmitted as Non-degree only.)  

Failure to complete a University Withdrawal Form by the drop deadline of a current or future semester will result in tuition liabilities being incurred for courses in which a student is registered for that semester.

Administrative Withdrawal ("Stop Out")

If a student leaves the University without having completed an Official Withdrawal Form the student will be considered a "stop out" and will be administratively withdrawn. Administrative Withdrawal status will be determined at the add deadline for course registration of the major semester (fall or spring) in which the student does not register. If an administratively withdrawn status is determined for a student, the Registrar's Office will process an Administrative Withdrawal for the student for that semester and the student's academic transcript will be so noted.  Graduate and Undergraduate degree-seeking students who are administratively withdrawn and who have not been in attendance for three or more consecutive semesters, excluding summer, must apply for readmission through the appropriate Office of Admissions and follow the degree requirements associated with the term of their readmission to the University. (Former Non-degree students may be readmitted as Non-degree only.)

Leave of Absence

A student may request a one-semester Leave of Absence for an upcoming major semester (fall or spring) for documented extenuating circumstances. The granting of a Leave of Absence should not be considered a routine process and requires specific and detailed documentation of the medical, health or extenuating personal reasons for requesting the leave. An approved Leave of Absence insures that during the leave, any student loans continue to be deferred and the student will retain current academic good-standing status with the University. If a Leave of Absence form is properly approved by the Provost, the Registrar's Office will process the form and record the leave on the student's academic transcript. The Leave of Absence will start on the first day of the semester for which the Leave of Absence is granted and will continue until the last day of that semester. The student does not need to reapply to return to the University and can register for classes up to the add deadline for the semester that starts at the end of the Leave of Absence. Extensions for a Leave of Absence cannot be granted.

If students do NOT register by the add deadline of the semester for which they are to return, their status will revert to "stop out" and they will be administratively withdrawn.

A Leave of Absence will only be granted for one major semester (fall or spring) since loan obligations will start after the end of the leave or if the student does not return when specified by the Leave of Absence.

NOTE:  Loan repayment obligations are applicable. Students who are no longer registered at the University of Saint Joseph should contact the Financial Aid Office at 860.231.319 to discuss and understand the conditions of their enrollment status and loan repayment obligations. 

Real World Experience

Independent Study

Undergraduate

A student who wishes to study in an area that is not available among the course offerings of a department may undertake independent study. Two levels of independent study, exploratory and advanced, are provided. To be accepted for an exploratory independent study, a student must have achieved at least a 2.50 GPA during the previous semester. A student applying for an advanced independent study should have a cumulative GPA of 3.0 and must have the approval of the appropriate department chairperson and the dean of the school prior to registration. Approved applications for exploratory or advanced independent study must be submitted to the registrar at the time of registration. Courses listed in the catalog may not be taken as independent study.

Graduate

A student who wishes to study in an area that is not available among the course offerings of a department may undertake independent study. Students are encouraged to build independent study or research projects into their programs as a way of testing their understanding of the mastery and techniques of scholarship and a demonstration of ability to gather, analyze, and present data within their field of specialization.

Applications for Independent Study/Research and Advanced Independent Study/Research are available from department chairpersons or in the Office of Graduate and Professional Studies. Completed application forms and registration are accepted through the add/drop period of each semester. Courses listed in the catalog may not be taken as independent study.

Internships

Undergraduate and Graduate

Internships provide students with a semester of work experience in their field of study and assist them in making informed decisions on career direction. An intern is usually a junior or senior with a minimum GPA of 2.5, who is recommended for an internship by her/his advisor for the benefit of the student, the work setting, and the University. Academic credit will be determined by the faculty sponsor and approved by the department chairperson. The director of Career Services works with the faculty sponsor (as determined by the academic department) to assist students in arranging internship opportunities.

Credit hours:

  40 hours minimum 1 credit (for certification programs)
  120 hours (8 hours/week for 15 weeks) 3 credits
  240 hours (16 hours/week for 15 weeks) 6 credits
     

Counseling and Family Therapy, Education/Special Education, Social Work, Sociology, and Nursing have their own internship arrangements. They do not participate in this process.

Graduate Assistantship

Graduate

Graduate Assistantships are available through the Office of Graduate Admissions and Academic Services. The Graduate Assistantship Program offers matriculated graduate students the opportunity to gain valuable academic and workplace experience in the University of Saint Joseph community in exchange for tuition assistance or stipend. Eligible students must submit the Student Application with an attached resume to the Office of Graduate Admissions and Academic Services in McDonough Hall. Student applications can be found at www.usj.edu/graduateassistantship.

When to Apply?

The Student Application for each academic year is posted the first week of April and must be submitted by early May. Applications will be accepted after that time; however, those applicants will only be considered if a position opens during the academic year.

Study Abroad

Undergraduate

The University of Saint Joseph encourages students from all academic disciplines to study abroad for an academic year, a semester, or short-term period (summer, winter, or spring breaks) in preparation for living in an interdependent world. Students may choose from a list of approved study abroad programs sponsored by colleges, universities, and agencies in this country as well as in host countries.

The University also has exchange agreements with institutions in the Netherlands and in Great Britain. The University also offers a short-term education, counseling, and community health program in Guyana. In addition, the University participates in special international education networks in other countries and offers a variety of faculty-led short-term study tours.

To ensure proper selection of programs and courses, students must obtain authorization from their academic advisor, the chair of the academic department, the dean of the school, the director of international studies, and the director of the Student Financial Services at least one semester prior to their anticipated departure.

Students accepted for study abroad are expected to:

  • Have a minimum GPA of 2.75
  • Be in the second semester of sophomore year, junior year, or first semester of  senior year
  • Meet the requirements of the Office of International Studies & Programs
  • Submit a formal evaluation of the overseas educational experience to International Studies & Programs immediately after returning

Students studying abroad in approved programs are charged a processing fee per semester of international study. Please contact the bursar for current rates. Processing fees are also charged on a sliding scale for short-term programs. Application forms, a list of approved programs, and the Study Abroad Handbook are available from the International Studies & Programs, Lynch Hall.

Grading Policy for Embedded Study Abroad Trips

  • Students will be awarded a grade of NG at the end of the semester, prior to their trip abroad. Embedded trips may occur during mid-semester break or at the end of the spring or fall semester. The actual letter grade will be given two weeks after the conclusion of the trip so that students can complete their assignments.
  • If graduating seniors register for a trip taking place after Commencement, they may be able to walk during Commencement (assuming they meet the requirements for walking) if they agree to complete their assignments within the two-week period. The instructors of the embedded trip will be given a 48-hour turnaround time to post the grades, at which time the grade of NG will change to the actual letter grade.
  • The Office of International Studies & Programs will work closely with the Registrar's Office to ensure that these arrangements are made in a timely manner so that the automatic F does not appear on the student's transcript

Code of Academic Integrity

Undergraduate

The complete procedures can be found in the student handbook.

Article I Preamble

Absolute integrity is expected of every student in all academic undertakings. An atmosphere of academic integrity is inherent in the philosophy of the University of Saint Joseph and shall be upheld by all members of this community.

Article II Definition

Academic integrity is the responsibility a student assumes for honestly representing all academic work. This responsibility implies that the student will in no way either misrepresent her/his work or unfairly advance her/his academic status and will neither encourage nor assist another student in so doing. Violations of academic integrity include plagiarism, cheating, fabrication, and facilitating academic dishonesty. Definitions of these terms are cited below as a guide and are to be applied within reason by the University of Saint Joseph faculty. Students are responsible for determining each professor's expectations for particular assignments (e.g., Do ideas need to be cited in a written examination? What constitutes cooperation or cheating on a take-home assignment?).

Plagiarism: "The presentation of someone else's ideas or words as your own," as in the following examples:1

• "Copying a phrase, a sentence, or a longer passage from a source and passing it off as your own"
• "Summarizing or paraphrasing someone else's ideas without acknowledging your debt"
• "Handing in as your own work a paper you have bought, had a friend write, or copied from another student."2

Cheating: "Intentionally using or attempting to use unauthorized materials, information, or study aids in any academic exercise"3

Fabrication: "Intentional and unauthorized falsification or invention of any information or citation in an academic exercise"4

Facilitating academic dishonesty: "Intentionally or knowingly helping or attempting to help another to violate any provision of this code"5

Academic work includes quizzes, tests, midterm examinations, final examinations, theses, comprehensive examinations, research projects, take-home assignments, laboratory work, and all other forms of oral or written academic endeavor.


1 Fowler, H. R. and Aaron, J. E., The Little, Brown Handbook. (New York: Longman, 2001) 686.
2 Fowler and Aaron, 686.
3 Kibler, W.L., Nuss, E.M., Paterson, B.G, and Pavela, G. Academic Integrity and Student Development. (Asheville, NC: College Administration Publications, 1988) 69-70.
4 Kibler et al., 69-70.
5 Kibler et al., 69-70.


Article III Committee on Academic Integrity

A. Role
The Committee on Academic Integrity shall:

1. Promote expectations for academic integrity
2. Ensure fairness and consistency in the procedures and outcomes
3. Review all uncontested cases and, if necessary, take further disciplinary action
4. Review and settle all contested cases in which academic sanctions are applied
5. Record all cases of academic dishonesty within the University. This file shall be maintained in the office of the Provost.

B. Composition
The committee shall consist of:

  • Three students (seniors or juniors) selected by the Student Government Association as members of the standing committee
  • Two faculty members, with tenure, appointed by the Executive Committee of the Faculty Committee of the Whole as members of the standing committee
  • One additional faculty member appointed to the committee for a particular case by the Dean of the School in which the infraction is alleged (hereafter to be referred to as the Dean). If possible, this faculty member should be the Department Chairperson of the faculty member alleging a violation of academic integrity.
  • The Dean, who votes only in the case of a tie
  • The instructor is allowed but is not required to be present

Article IV Academic Integrity Procedure

A. When Academic Dishonesty is Suspected:

  1. The faculty member informs the student of the allegations while taking into account the need to respect each student's privacy and the goal of maintaining an environment that supports teaching and learning. The faculty member shall inform the student of the opportunity to respond within three days.
  2. After presenting a student with the allegation that she or he violated the University's Code of Academic Integrity, the faculty member waits for three days to allow both parties to consider the allegations and responses
  3. After three days the faculty member and the student discuss the consequences and the student will sign the University's academic integrity form. The faculty member has one working day in which to turn the form into the Dean's Office.
  4. The faculty member may also opt to pursue a disciplinary action (academic sanction) in conjunction with the University Committee on Academic Integrity. Normally, it is preferable to settle issues privately, which means relying on the awarding of grades and course-related activities to support the learning process, rather than requesting additional disciplinary sanctions.
  5. Throughout the academic integrity process, grading authority remains the responsibility of the instructor

B. If the Student Accepts Responsibility for the Violation and the Proposed Academic Sanction:

  1. If the sanction involves course work or a course grade and the student accepts the sanction, the faculty member has the student sign the University's academic integrity form. This form is forwarded, through the Dean, to the Committee on Academic Integrity. If this committee believes that no further sanction is required, this form is forwarded to the Provost to be filed, and the matter is closed.
  2. In either of the following conditions the committee will be convened to define additional sanctions in response to the student's behavior: A) On the third offense; or B) At the faculty member's request.

C. If the Student Does Not Admit Responsibility for an Academic Integrity Violation:

  1. The Instructor forwards the case to the Committee on Academic Integrity, via the Dean, who convenes the Committee
  2. The Committee issues a written statement of the specific charges against the student. The student is allowed 10 days to write a response/defense to these charges and has the right to examine, prior to a hearing, any written evidence or exhibits the Committee will consider. The student will be informed of the hearing date, time, and location, and should be given 20 days (including the initial 10 days in which to write a response) to prepare a defense. More than one charge against a student may be considered at a hearing.
  3. A hearing may be conducted in the absence of a student who fails to appear after the Committee has made a reasonable effort to provide adequate advance notice of the hearing time, date, and location
  4. The hearing is not open
  5. The student may bring an advisor of her or his choice from within the University community, who is not representing the student as an attorney, to the hearing. A reasonable effort should be made to accommodate the schedule of an advisor who will assist the accused student. The Committee has broad discretion in granting continuances.
  6. Any Committee member who has been involved in investigating or prosecuting the case should not serve on the Committee while it is reviewing the particular case and a replacement must be appointed (by the Student Government Association, the Executive Committee of the Faculty Committee of the Whole, or the administration) for this investigation.
  7. The student's guilt shall be established by clear and convincing evidence. Circumstantial evidence may be used, as may "hearsay" evidence.
  8. The student may confront and cross-examine witnesses
  9. The hearings shall be recorded by use of tape recorder and/or qualified court reporter may be allowed to attend the hearing to record the proceedings. The original record of the hearing shall be retained in a confidential file in the Office of the Provost for a period of seven years after the event. Only the Provost shall have access to these records. The proceedings of the appeals hearing as well as all written documents arising out of it are to be held in the strictest confidence. Expenses of any court reporter shall be paid by the party requesting the reporter and a copy of the transcript shall be made available to the other party.
  10.  A decision is made by majority vote of the Committee
  11. A student who is found guilty shall be given a written statement of reasons for the determination. A hearing panel may consider a pattern of lying and fabrication by the student at a hearing and may impose a more severe penalty as a result.
  12. After the formal hearing or review, the Committee may determine what disciplinary sanctions should be imposed. The student will be informed of these within 15 days of the hearing by registered mail.
  13. In cases where the most severe penalties are imposed the student may appeal to the Provost within 15 days of receiving of the formal letter informing her/him of the sanctions

Article V Sanctions

A. Decision of the Committee on Academic Integrity

  1. The Committee on Academic Integrity may determine to dismiss a case or may decide on an appropriate sanction
  2. Each potential breach of Academic Integrity should be considered individually and decisions concerning sanctions shall be made on a case-by-case basis. This means that there is not specific sanction associated automatically with a particular violation.
  3. The decision of the Committee is final. It cannot be appealed to the Student Appeals Board.

B. Examples of Sanctions
Academic sanctions range from a warning to failure of the course to expulsion. Sanctions include, but are not limited to:

  • Written warning
  • A grade of zero for the assignment
  • Failure of the course
  • An "XF" grade for the course (An XF grade is an indication that the student has failed a course because of a violation of academic integrity. When the grade is assigned, the transcript shall indicate the meaning of this notation. The XF grade is awarded only with the concurrence of the instructor and the University Committee on Academic Integrity. The awarding of an XF grade should be a rare occurrence and reserved for the most serious breaches of academic integrity.)
  • Probation, suspension, or expulsion from the University

Student appeals not within the purview of this policy will follow the student appeals policy as outlined in section "Students Appeals Board."

Graduate

Absolute integrity is expected of every student in all academic undertakings. An atmosphere of academic integrity is inherent in the philosophy of the University of Saint Joseph and shall be upheld by all members of this community.

Academic integrity is the responsibility a student assumes for honestly representing all academic work. This responsibility implies the student will in no way misrepresent her or his work or unfairly advance her or his academic status and will neither encourage nor assist another student in so doing. Violations of academic integrity include plagiarism, cheating, fabrication, and facilitating academic dishonesty. Definitions of these terms are cited below as a guide and are to be applied within reason by the University of Saint Joseph faculty. Students are responsible for determining each professor's expectations for particular assignments (e.g., Do ideas need to be cited in a written examination? What constitutes cooperation or cheating on a take-home assignment?).

Plagiarism: "The presentation of someone else's ideas or words as your own,"11 as in the following examples:

  • "Copying a phrase, a sentence, or a longer passage from a source and passing it off as your own"
  • "Summarizing or paraphrasing someone else's ideas without acknowledging your debt"
  • "Handing in as your own work a paper you have bought, had a friend write, or copied from another student."12

Cheating: "Intentionally using or attempting to use unauthorized materials, information, or study aids in any academic exercise"13

Fabrication: "Intentional and unauthorized falsification or invention of any information or citation in an academic exercise"14

Facilitating Academic Dishonesty: "Intentionally or knowingly helping or attempting to help another to violate any provision of this code"15


11 Fowler, H. R. and Aaron, J. E., The Little, Brown Handbook. (New York: Longman, 2001) page 686.
12 Fowler and Aaron, page 686.
13 Kibler, W.L., Nuss, E.M., Paterson, B.G, and Pavela, G. Academic Integrity and Student Development (Asheville, NC: College Administration Publications, Inc., 1988) pages 69-70.
14 Kibler, Nuss, Paterson, and Pavela, pages 69-70.
15 Kibler, Nuss, Paterson, and Pavela, pages 69-70.


While cheating in various forms and failure to acknowledge the proper sources of ideas can be an integrity problem using any communication medium or in any learning environment, the most common problem in today's university learning environment is the practice of constructing papers or written discussion postings by electronically copying text from a variety of sources, and submitting it as one's own writing. Whether the sources are cited or not, this is not acceptable academic behavior.

  1. Included within the Academic Integrity Policy is all academic work including quizzes, tests, mid-term examinations, final examinations, theses, comprehensive examinations, research projects, take-home assignments, laboratory work, papers, essays, threaded-discussions, and all other forms of oral or written academic endeavor
  2. An individual with questions concerning the Code of Academic Integrity should consult the Dean of Graduate and Professional Studies/ Director of Graduate Admissions and Academic Services. It is the responsibility of each (non-student) member of the graduate community to refer any perceived threat to this Graduate Academic Integrity Policy to the Dean of Graduate and Professional Studies.
  3. An Academic Integrity Committee is convened on an ad hoc basis to deal with all challenged cases of academic dishonesty within the Graduate School. In addition to any duplicate records kept by Graduate Program Directors, all files and records regarding academic integrity shall be maintained in the Office of the Graduate School.
  4. The committee shall consist of three graduate students, three tenured graduate faculty members, preferably from different departments, appointed by the chair of the Graduate School Committee; one additional faculty member may be appointed to the committee for a particular case by the Dean of Graduate and Professional Studies. If possible, this additional faculty member should be the Department Chairperson of the faculty member alleging a violation of academic integrity. The Dean of Graduate and Professional Studies votes only in the case of a tie. The instructor/professor and/or student involved are allowed to attend the meeting(s) of the committee, but neither is required to be present.

When Academic Dishonesty is Suspected in a Graduate Course:

  1. Students noticing a breach of integrity policy should inform the instructor in the class
  2. An instructor being informed of a breach of integrity policy, or noticing such herself/himself, assembles evidence of improper behavior. (e.g., The faculty member downloads a color coded "Originality Report" from www.turnitin.com.)
  3. The instructor then fills out the Academic Integrity Form, including recommended remediation/penalty
  4. The instructor sends the form (retaining a copy) and copies of evidence to the student. This can be done electronically or hard copy, whichever is most expedient. If sent electronically, the faculty member should use email receipt acknowledgment methods. A copy of the evidence of receipt is kept by the faculty member. However, even if there is no response from the student, the process moves forward after 5 working days. The instructor should keep documentation of attempts to contact the student (e.g. copies of emails, copies of letters, etc.).
  5. The student should respond to the faculty member by signing the Academic Integrity Form either agreeing or disagreeing with the finding and the remediation/penalty. Whether or not any supplemental verbal communication has occurred, everything must be forwarded in writing. Note: When the student responds to the faculty member, she/he may add any additional explanation or justification - but ultimately the student must either agree or reject the faculty member's findings and recommendations/sanctions.
  6. The signed form, evidence, and student additions are forwarded to the Director of Graduate Admissions and Academic Services by the instructor/professor. These documents are printed and placed in the student's folder in the Graduate Office. Color-coded Turnitin Originality Reports that could be misunderstood without the color-coding should be printed in color.
  7. If the student has agreed with the current allegations, recommendations, or sanctions, these remediations/penalties are carried out
  8. If the student has not responded to the faculty member within 5 working days, the unsigned forms, evidence, communications, receipts of notification, and any additional documentation are forwarded to the Director of Graduate Admissions and Academic Services. These documents are printed and placed in the student's folder in the Graduate Office.
  9. When the form is filed in the student's folder, the entire file should be inspected and the Director of Graduate Admissions and Academic Services and the Dean of Graduate and Professional Studies should confer

9a. If the student disagrees with the allegation and/or recommendations/sanctions, the Director of Graduate Admissions and Academic Services calls for an Integrity Committee (composition noted above) to be formed to hear the case. The Director of Graduate Student forwards a copy of the form to the Director of the Graduate program in which the student is enrolled.

9b. If there are any earlier Integrity Policy violations in evidence in the folder the documentation of all integrity violations are then reviewed by the Graduate Admissions and Academic Services Director or Dean of Graduate and Professional Studies. Even if the student has agreed with the current violation/sanctions, if more than one infraction has indeed occurred, an Integrity Committee (composition of committee noted above) hearing of the case is then called by the Dean of Graduate and Professional Studies.

9c. The findings and recommendations of the Academic Integrity Committee are then executed. Assuring the implementation of these recommendations is the responsibility of the Dean of Graduate and Professional Studies/Director of Graduate Academic and Academic Services. A copy of the findings and recommendations of the Academic Integrity Committee is forwarded to the Graduate Program Director of the program in which the student is enrolled for information purposes. 

Procedures for an Academic Integrity Committee Hearing

  1. The student will be informed of the hearing date, time, and location. The student has the right to examine, prior to a hearing, any written evidence or exhibits the Committee will consider, although these typically would have already been shared with the student (see above).
  2. A hearing may be conducted in the absence of a student who fails to appear after the Committee has made a reasonable effort to provide adequate advance notice of the hearing time, date, and location
  3. The hearing is not open, but may take place in person or through electronic medium (e.g., conference calls, web cam, etc.)
  4. The student may bring to the hearing an advisor of her or his choice from within the University community. The advisor is there to provide advice to the student, not to act as the student's representative. A reasonable effort should be made to accommodate the schedule of an advisor who will assist the accused student. The Committee has broad discretion in granting continuances.
  5. Any individual (e.g. faculty member) who has been involved in investigating the case should not serve on the Committee while it is reviewing the particular case
  6. The student's guilt shall be established by clear and convincing evidence. Circumstantial evidence may be used, as may "hearsay" evidence.
  7. The student may speak and discuss findings with committee members
  8. The hearings shall be recorded by use of tape or digital recorder. The original record of the hearing shall be retained in a confidential file in the Graduate Office for a period of seven years after the event. Following the hearing, only the Director of Graduate Admissions and Academic Services or Dean of Graduate and Professional Studies shall have access to these records. The proceedings of the hearing as well as all written documents arising out of it are to be held in the strictest confidence.
  9. A decision is made by majority vote of the Committee
  10. A student who is found guilty shall be given a written statement of reasons for the determination. The committee may consider a pattern of lying and fabrication by the student at the review and may impose a more severe penalty as a result.
  11. After the formal review, the Committee shall determine what disciplinary sanctions should be imposed. The student will be informed of these within 10 days after the hearing by registered mail, as well as by email.
  12. The student has the right to appeal hearing results to the Provost within 10 days of receiving the formal notification informing her/him of the sanctions. Note: If either the student or the faculty member feels that justice has not been served by the committee, either individual may appeal to the Provost for a review of the case. The Provost's decision is final.

Decision of the Committee on Academic Integrity

  1. The Committee on Academic Integrity may determine to dismiss a case or may decide on an appropriate sanction
  2. Each potential breach of Academic Integrity should be considered individually and decisions concerning sanctions shall be made on a case-by-case basis as per the sequence outlined above. This means that there is not a specific sanction(s) associated automatically with a particular violation.

Examples of Sanctions

Academic sanctions range from a warning to failure of the course to expulsion. Sanction include, but are not limited to:

  • Written warning
  • A grade of zero for the assignment
  • Failure of the course
  • An "XF" grade for the course (An XF grade is an indication that the student has failed a course because of a violation of academic integrity. When the grade is assigned, the transcript shall indicate the meaning of this notation. The XF grade is awarded only with the concurrence of the instructor and the Committee. The awarding of an XF grade should be a rare occurrence and reserved for the most serious breaches of academic integrity.)
  • Probation, suspension, or expulsion from the University

The report of the Academic Integrity Committee and/or the notification to the student of the findings shall be forwarded to:

  • Graduate Office, to be placed in the student's Academic Integrity File
  • Dean of Graduate and Professional Studies
  • Provost 

Undergraduate Grievance and Appeal Procedure

An undergraduate student with a grievance should confer first with the instructor and her/his advisor. If the grievance needs further discussion, the student brings it to the department chair. Should further consideration of the issue be required, it is brought to the dean of the school, who then calls together an ad hoc committee consisting of another student, instructor, advisor, department chair, dean of the school, and provost.

If you are taking any University of Saint Joseph courses and you have a complaint about your experience with the University of Saint Joseph, you can follow the University's process for student appeals and grievances, which is located in the Student Handbook.

For students who have exhausted all institutional grievance procedures, the following state and accrediting agencies are available to address complaints:

  1. The University's regional accrediting agency, the New England Association of Schools and Colleges (NEASC), which is located at 3 Burlington Woods Drive, Suite 100, Burlington, MA 01803, at 855.886.3272 or https://cihe.neasc.org/about_us/staff/.      
     
  2. The Connecticut Office of Higher Education, at: Office of Higher Education, 61 Woodland Street, Hartford, CT  06105-2326; at 800.842.0229;  www.ctohe.org/studentcomplaints.shtml.
     
  3. If you reside outside of Connecticut and are attending the University of Saint Joseph via an online distance learning course, in many cases you can file a complaint in the state where you are residing. As required by federal regulations, we direct you to a list of resources compiled and updated by the State Higher Education Executive Officers: http://www.sheeo.org/stateauth/Complaint%20Process%20Links.pdf.

Graduate Grievance and Appeal Procedure

A graduate student with a grievance should confer first with the instructor and her/his advisor. If the grievance needs further discussion, the student brings it to the department chair. Should further consideration of the issue be required, it is brought to the dean of the school.  If it is not resolved by the school dean, the matter is resolved by the provost.

For students who have exhausted all institutional grievance procedures, the following state and accrediting agencies are available to address complaints:

  1. The University's regional accrediting agency, the New England Association of Schools and Colleges (NEASC), which is located at 3 Burlington Woods Drive, Suite 100, Burlington, MA, 01803 at 855.886.3272 or https://cihe.neasc.org/about_us/staff/.      
     
  2. The Connecticut Office of Higher Education, at: Office of Higher Education, 61 Woodland Street, Hartford, CT  06105-2326; 800.842.0229;  www.ctohe.org/studentcomplaints.shtml.
     
  3. If you reside outside of Connecticut and are attending the University of Saint Joseph via an online distance learning course, in many cases you can file a complaint in the state where you are residing. As required by federal regulations, we direct you to a list of resources compiled and updated by the State Higher Education Executive Officers: http://www.sheeo.org/stateauth/Complaint%20Process%20Links.pdf.

FERPA (Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act)

Undergraduate and Graduate

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) affords students certain rights with respect to their education records. These rights include:

  1. The right to inspect and review the student's education records within 45 days of the day the University receives a request for access. A student should submit to the registrar, dean, head of the academic department, or other appropriate official, written requests that identify the record(s) the student wishes to inspect. The University official will make arrangements for access and notify the student of the time and place where the records may be inspected. If the records are not maintained by the University official to whom the request was submitted, that official shall advise the student of the correct official to whom the request should be addressed.
     
  2. The right to request the amendment of the student's education records that the student believes is inaccurate, misleading, or otherwise in violation of the student's privacy under FERPA. Students may ask the University to amend a record that they believe is inaccurate. They should write the University official responsible for the record, clearly identify the part of the record they want changed, and specify why it is inaccurate.

    If the University decides not to amend the record as requested by the student, the University will notify the student of the decision and advise the student of his or her right to a hearing regarding the request for amendment. Additional information regarding the hearing procedures will be provide to the student when notified of the right to a hearing.
     
  3. The right to provide written consent before the University discloses personally identifiable information contained in the student's education records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent.

    The University discloses education records without a student's prior consent under the FERPA exception for disclosure to school officials with legitimate educational interests. A school official is a person employed by the University in an administrative, supervisory, academic or research, or support staff position (including law enforcement personnel and health staff); a person or company with whom the University has contracted (such as an attorney, auditor, or collection agent); a person serving on the Board of Trustees; or a student serving on an official committee, such as a disciplinary or grievance committee, or assisting another school official in performing his or her tasks.

    A school official has a legitimate education interest if the official needs to review an education record in order to fulfill his or her professional responsibilities for the University.
     
  4. The right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning alleged failures by the University to comply with the requirements of FERPA. The name and address of the office that administers FERPA is:

Family Policy Compliance Office
U.S. Department of Education
400 Maryland Avenue
SW Washington, DC 20202-4605

Directory Information

Institutions may disclose information on a student without violating FERPA if it has designated that information as "directory information." The University of Saint Joseph defines directory information as:

  • Name
  • Address
  • Telephone Number
  • Major field of study
  • Dates of Attendance
  • Current enrollment status (full/part time)
  • Class standing
  • Receipt or non-receipt of a degree
  • Academic Awards received (Dean's List, honor roll)

Prior written consent from the student is required before releasing non-directory information (other than the above). The University of Saint Joseph may not release directory information to educational officials unless written notification to release directory information is on file in the Registrar's Office.

FERPA Directory Information Opt-Out

If you do not want the University to disclose directory information from your education records without your prior written consent, you must complete a form and return it to the Registrar's Office. Your information will not be released from the time we receive your form until the request is rescinded. If directory information is released prior to receiving your opt-out request, the University may not be able to stop the use of your information. Therefore, it is recommended that you file the opt-out form at registration.

Please complete the FERPA Directory Information Opt-Out form (available in the Registrar's Office) if you do not wish to have your directory information disclosed to third parties. Upon receipt, your request will remain in effect until you tell the Registrar's Office that you no longer wish to keep your information private. Prior to filing your request, please consider all the consequences of opting out. For example, if you tell the Registrar's Office not to disclose your directory information to third parties, they will not share your information with anyone (except persons who have a right to see your information under the law), including persons or agencies offering jobs and educational benefits such as scholarships and discounts; media sources; companies that manufacture class rings and publish yearbooks, etc. Also note that if you have requested that the Registrar's Office not disclose your directory information but you would like to have your name appear in the University commencement program, you must provide signed written consent prior to that time.

 

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